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Teaching Robots

Today, more sophisticated and versatile kits for use in K-12 schools are available from a number of companies that create robots with new sensing technologies programmable in a variety of languages. Ozobot is a robot that teaches children to code and reason deductively while configuring it to dance or play based on color-coded patterns.[75] Cubelets help teach children logical thinking through assembling robot blocks to think, act, or sense, depending upon the function of the different blocks.[76] Wonder Workshop’s Dash and Dot span a range of programming capabilities. Children eight years old and older can create simple actions using a visual programming language, Blockly, or build iOS and Android applications using C or Java.[77] PLEO rb is a robot pet that helps children learn biology by teaching the robot to react to different aspects of the environment.[78]  However, while fun and engaging for some, in order for such kits to become widespread, there will need to be compelling evidence that they improve students’ academic performance.



[75] Ozobot, accessed August 1, 2016, http://ozobot.com/.

[76] “Cubelets,” Modular Robotics, accessed August 1, 2016, http://www.modrobotics.com/cubelets.

[77] “Meet Dash,” Wonder Workshop, accessed August 1, 2016, https://www.makewonder.com/dash.

[78] “Pleo rb,” Innvo Labs, accessed August 1, 2016, http://www.pleoworld.com/pleo_rb/eng/lifeform.php.

 

Cite This Report

Peter Stone, Rodney Brooks, Erik Brynjolfsson, Ryan Calo, Oren Etzioni, Greg Hager, Julia Hirschberg, Shivaram Kalyanakrishnan, Ece Kamar, Sarit Kraus, Kevin Leyton-Brown, David Parkes, William Press, AnnaLee Saxenian, Julie Shah, Milind Tambe, and Astro Teller.  "Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030." One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence: Report of the 2015-2016 Study Panel, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,  September 2016. Doc: http://ai100.stanford.edu/2016-report. Accessed:  September 6, 2016.